Thankful Tuesday

2017 Achievements

2017 is coming to an end, and we are excited to share with you all that we were able to achieve this year because of your generosity. 

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January

Kicked off the new year with our first Community Enrichment presentation by hosting the Neuro Development Clinic event of Social Thinking delivered by Betsey Jacobs in Fairbanks at ACCA.

Danielle attended our first All Alaska Pediatric Partnership meeting in Fairbanks with an invite by Tamar, the executive director.

Fairbanks Community Mental Health Clinic received a 101 presentation on ASA and Autism from the Autism Society of Alaska.

Alaska State Trooper Captain Ron Wall and Danielle Tessen presented on Project Lifesaver at the Fairbanks Chamber meeting and received sponsorship of bracelets after presentation.

February

Community Enrichment: ASA Board member Theresa Sabens and presentation partner Traci Roon spoke at Fairbanks Community Mental Health on Sensory Processing.

Myway Matinee 3 month trial began in Fairbanks at Regal Cinemas for Sensory Friendly Movie Showings after a year of asking.

Began the process for submitting an Alaska Autism License Plate Bill with National’s advice as a fundraising method, unfortunately the bill did not pass.

Our board member Joshua kicked off his Community Outreach with a table at a UAF Hockey Night.

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We were selected as a non-profit in the McHenry Ball tournament at North Pole Middle school and funds were raised on our behalf from the student’s North Pole Champions for Charity also held a bingo night and auction.

March

Community Enrichment: Brandy, Danielle and Denys presented at TVC to the medical professionals on Autism and how to better partner with ASA.

ASA helped get the Wrights Law Training streamed to Fairbanks at UAF thanks to Stone Soup Group.

We hosted a fundraising paint nite at Pioneer Park.

Myway Matinee 3 month trial in Fairbanks at Regal Cinemas for Sensory Friendly Movie Showings.

Dance 2 fit hosted a wonderful third party event fundraiser.

ASA partnered with AARC to host autism self advocate Dani Bowman at Pioneer Park.

Joshua joined the FASD Sensory Swim as the ASA representative.

April

April was Autism Awareness Month!

Community Enrichment: Bio medical approach to Autism with Suzette Mailloux at the Public Library.

The annual Human Ribbon at UAF Theresa and Danielle presented at the Fairbanks Children’s Museum.

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ASA held two more Paint Nite fundraisers at Gambardella’s and Salcha.

UAF School of Education Hosted a third party fundraiser with a silent auction and donated the money raised to help fund our 2nd Annual Alaska Autism Conference keynote speaker.

Fairbanks Children’s Museum held a sensory friendly version of their interactive performance play.

Myway Matinee PASSED the month trial and began year round in Fairbanks at Regal Cinemas for Sensory Friendly Movie Showings.

Soldotna hosted an Extravaganza event.

May

We were selected as Papa John’s Charity of the month.

June

9th Annual Alaska 5k for Autism.

Betsey Jacobs and Danielle Tessen presented to Morning Star Ranch on Autism, Zones of Regulation per their request on how to improve their relationships with their adults with autism.

We were able to approve one scholarship for a camper to attend Camp Yes in the Woods.

Danielle and Joshua ran an activity on “your feet are not for kicking” at Camp Yes in the Woods.

August

Executive Director Danielle, Board Secretary Denys and President Brandy present a training to the CTC Law Enforcement Academy on autism and focused on signs and suggestions for positive and effective interactions with those who experience autism and their support systems and care providers.

Joshua attended the Tanana Valley State Fair and took part in the American Disability Act celebration and awareness day activities.20664973_10155101720299585_4219217782893141669_n

Danielle, Denys and Brandy presented to the Fairbanks Memorial Hospital Emergency Room Staff/Nurses on the same curriculum after a parent reached out on an issue her family experienced at the hospital.

Children’s Museum sensory day with Joshua as our representative.

October

In October we hosted Michelle Garcia Winner and 8 State guest speakers at our 2nd Alaska State Autism Conference.

In addition to the conference, Paige Talvi put together an amazing evening event, a silent auction beer and wine tasting fundraiser.DSC_0114

Partnered with Alaska Autism Resource Center and Stone Soup Group to host a presentation for running your own support group.

Fairbanks hosted the first Wings for All program in partnership with The Arch of Anchorage and FRA.

November

Joshua attended a community outreach event on Fort Wainwright.

December

Host our 4th Annual Sensory Santa event.


Thank You!

The Autism Society of Alaska is approaching GivingTuesday a little different this year. Instead of asking for Y-O-U to give to US, we want to take the day to THANK you for all the giving you have done all year long. Without YOU we do not exist.

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We would like to give a ThankfulTuesday shoutout to all of the volunteers who have positively impacted ASA with their generosity. Here are a few we want to take some time to focus on from 2017:

Caitlin Frye, our grant writer
Amanda Lash, our walk director for our  9th Annual 5k
Paige Talvi and her entire team, ran our Beer and Wine Tasting Silent Auction
Gene Lunney, donated the Roundup Steakhouse, food, and alcohol for our auction
George and Amy Viltrakis, our Sensory Santa and his wife
Scott Lonergan, Event Graphic Design Consultant
Mark Christensen, Tech support
We also want to thank all of our board members from the past and all of our current members:
Brandy Raby, President
Denys Collins, Secretary
Dawn Ham, Treasurer
Joshua Kamerick, Board Member who Experiences Autism
Alana Frazier, Board Member in the Professional Field
Heidi Haas, Founding Honorary Board Member
Betsey Jacobs, Honorary Board Member
*If you would like to volunteer your time, talent or treasure to ASA please connect with us. It takes every type of skill to keep an organization running.
http://www.asagoldenheart.org/volunteer

Sponsors

2017 9th Annual 5k for Autism:23755391_10155367346219585_9102009596387734617_n
Building Blocks
Greer Tank and Welding
Kinross Fort Knox
Fairbanks Native Association
Alaska Frontier
Ear Nose and Throat
Madden Real Estate
Fairbanks Behavior
96.9 River 98.1 k-Wolf
Nomadic Stars
DJay Entertainment

2017 2nd Annual Alaska Autism Conference:
Alaska Mental Health Trust Grant
SESA
AARC
UAF School of Ed
Hussman Grant
Governors Council
Building Blocks
Greer Tank
Baker Insurance
Arctic Pathways
Local 375
302 Operators Union
Sourdough Express
Laborers’ Local 942
Mt McKinley Bank
Fairbanks Memorial hospital

2017 4th Annual Sensory Santa:
Greer Tank

Safety Partners

14370121_10154124430879585_6528352622558162308_nSafety is important to the mission of us at ASA. Without our fantastic safety partners we can not achieve our mission! Thank you to both Alaska State Troopers Project Lifesaver and
UAF CTC Law Enforcement Safety Training for reaching out to us to partner.

 

 

 

There are so many more sponsors, partners, and volunteers we would like to thank. Without each and every one of you, nothing we do would be possible.  As a non profit, we rely heavily on those that support us in many different ways. Thank you!


*Donations are tax deductible if you would like to still take part in GivingTuesday.  You can donate online by visiting http://www.asagoldenheart.org/donate OR send donations to: 607 Old Steese Hwy, Suite B #285 Fairbanks, Alaska 99701 & make checks out to: Autism Society of Alaska.

 

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Beer&Wine Tasting Silent Auction

Over 100 people attended the Autism Society of Alaska’s first Beer and Wine Tasting Silent Auction

Written by Denys Collins

Over 100 people attended the Autism Society of Alaska’s first Beer and Wine Tasting Silent Auction on October 5th, 2017. The money raised will go a long way towards helping Alaskan families impacted by autism. The auction and tasting, which took place at Roundup Steakhouse, made over $9,000 through ticket and auction item sales.

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This festive event was highlighted by an impressive amount of widely varied items generously donated including:

  • Fully stocked fishing boat rental
  • Cabin stay
  • Art by Alaskan artist Karla Morreira
  • Gift certificates for the Nutcracker Ballet
  • An entire table of homemade desserts

DSC_0124 While bidding on items, attendees were able to try numerous types of beers, wines, and spirits including  Alaskan made whiskeys from Arctic Harvest. The tasting tables and auction items began in the lower level of Roundup Steakhouse then flowed upstairs, stocking the second level. Sounds of friends and families engaging in lighthearted bidding wars and conversations filled the DSC_0077restaurant. We were even lucky enough to have Michelle Garcia Winner, the creator of Social Thinking and keynote speaker from this year’s Autism Conference, join the fun.

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The atmosphere of this event was unlike many of those we have previously held. This allowed for a new group of generous community members to help support local individuals that experience autism and their families. This was one of our most successful events yet. We were able to raise over $9,000 which will allow us to continue:

  • Holding trainings for first responders
  • Accommodate sensory friendly events
  • Hosting Community Enrichment Nights
  • Accessing resources for individuals and families

It truly was a community event from those that planned the event to those that ran it. It would not have been possible without the assistance of countless people.  Gene Lunney, the owner of Roundup Steakhouse’s hospitality and kindness are unsurpassed. He provided not only the venue but also the food and alcohol. The help of Paige Talvi, Stefanie Bell, and their crew of volunteers was invaluable. They were vital to the solicitation of amazing donations,  the beautiful set up, and the quick and painless check out. As a non profit, we are nothing without the community that supports us.  It was a beautiful night watching the community come together to support local families impacted by autism.

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*All photos courtesy of our amazing volunteer photographer, Chelsey Klos with Willow Photography

2nd Annual Autism Conference

Over 200 people gathered at Pioneer Park

Written by Denys Collins

On October 5th and 6th, more than 200 people gathered at Pioneer Park for the Autism Society of Alaska’s Second Annual Autism Conference.   The two day event saw people from all over Alaska including attendees from the Aleutians. Individuals with autism, professionals, educators, family members, and caregivers filled the Civic Center ready to learn and connect. Michelle Garcia Winner began Thursday bright and early with her keynote on Social Thinking and focused the day applying it to younger kids. On day two she  dug deeper into Social Thinking with application on teens and adults. Following her second day keynote began the 8  breakout sessions from local Alaskan speakers and a chance to visit the 15 exhibit booths to conclude the final day.

The Needs of the State

Vibrations of conversations filled the air with people making face-to- face connections. Those interested in networking and learning about products, resources, and services that address the needs and enhance the lives of individuals that experience autism were able to connect on a deeper level during the conference. One parent stated, “These past few days have been so impactful to me.I have learned so much and have received the gift of perspective.While being so informative it has also been a very emotional 2 days.”

“A beautiful connection between information and individuals blooms during the conference. We format the topics based on the overarching questions our organization hears come through our door from across the State. As an options based organization we see our role as being the platform for all resources, information and services for Alaskans. The conference gives us a stage to connect our community to the diverse resources available to help reach the needs of our families, ” expressed Danielle Tessen, the Executive Director for the Autism Society of Alaska.

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Attendees Registering (Photo Courtesy of Willow Photography)

This Alaskan focused information and interaction was made  possible because of  our generous sponsors and dedicated volunteers. In order for every Alaskan that experiences autism to have the highest quality of life, we must all do our part together as a community. This is precisely what was seen at the conference, Alaskans uniting to support those impacted by autism. It is also the reason the Autism Society of Alaska saw a need to host the first conference in 2016.

“Alaska has some amazing resources.  My intention with starting the ASA conference was to network at every level from parents to service providers and individuals who experience autism all under one roof.  Along with that idea is the reality that most of us can not afford to travel outside to seek additional information.  With everyone together, it’s another opportunity to enrich what Alaska has with some additional amazing outside resources like we have had the opportunity to do with Dr. Temple Grandin and Michelle Garcia Winner.  The power of shared information is an amazing catapult to impacting the lives of those who experience autism and the community of those who support and love them!” explained Brandy Raby, Board President of the Autism Society of Alaska.

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Michelle Garcia Winner (Willow Photography)

Michelle Garcia Winner & Social Thinking

Michelle Garcia Winner guided attendees  through Social Thinking strategies and treatment frameworks during her interactive presentations. Those attending were able to learn and understand that socializing is more complex than they may have previously thought prior to the event. Winner broke up the multifaceted process into simpler steps and concepts to better understand and apply in day to day situations. She unpacked a topic most of us never think about to find the core social issue those with autism may experience. The message resonated with many, as we heard in the comments in our evaluations and public testimony. Those with the fortunate opportunity to listen  found the atmosphere to be “relaxed,” and the information to be “relevant” and “useful.” Winner answered questions and offered insightful workshop time among those present.  By the end, many left with a new mindset on social cognition and what it means to  socialize. A framework all attending can apply to day to day life to positively impact our community.

Keeping it Local

Most of the second day focused on  information and resources for Alaska. 15 exhibiting booths offered one on one time to discuss services, agencies, and resources in state. Speakers from around the area covered an extensive variety of topics.

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Christie Reinhardt (Courtesy of Abigail Paige Photography)
  • Feel at Home: Unlock the Door to Healthy Living and Leisure with Amiee C. Smith, M.A: Alaska Autism Resource Center.
  • Alphabet Soup: ABA, BCBA, RBT and EPSDT (Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Behavior Analysis and How Medicaid is Going to Cover It) with Christie Reinhardt, Program Coordinator II: The Governor’s Council on Disabilities & Special Education.
  • Microenterprise Grant Application Process with Larrisa Cummings, Microenterprise Grant Fund Administrator: UAA Center for Human Development.
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    Heidi Lieb-Williams (Abigail Paige Photography)
  • Functional Neurological Interventions for Autism with Dr. Daniel Costello, DC: Alaska Brain and Spine.
  • What Can I Choose? Exploring Devices and Equipment Commonly Used to Influence Sensory Needs with Derrick Cannon, PT, DPT & Traci Roon, PT: Building Blocks.
  • Living Puzzled: How Being Autistic has Shaped My Purpose in Life with Heidi Lieb-Wiliams: Speaker/Self Advocate, Mom, Self Employed Entrepreneur, Actress & Aspiring Filmmaker.
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    Traci Roon & Derrick Cannon (Abigail Paige Photography)
  • Building Emotional Awareness and Regulation Skills for Children who Experience Autism with Matthew Sena, MS LPC. & Bill Couthran, Psy.D.: Hope Counseling Center.
  • The New Dr. Brennan is a Woman and ECHO is a Community? What in the World is Going on in Public Health and What Does This Have to do With Me? with Christie Reinhardt, Coordinator II: The Governor’s Council on Disabilities & Special Education.

If you were unable to make it to the conference, you can find handouts at here as they become available.

Wrap It Up

Alaska, a large state  faced with unique challenges and needs, makes it overwhelming to try to locate services, resources, and information related to autism. This conference offers a platform for people to discover local resources in Alaska and offers a community for support and networking. All attendees, presenters, volunteers, organizations and sponsors that come together for the Alaska Autism Conference are seeking and providing a level of connection, information, resources, and support. The Autism Society of Alaska is filled with gratitude to be able to offer this event for a second time. We continue to learn from each conference to grow and adapt to meet the needs of our state.  

Building Blocks: Eric Ahrns, Rebecca Schichtel, Briana Brooks Talkabout Inc: David Jamison AARC: Aimee Smith, Tara Maltby
(Willow Photography)

Social Thinking Philosophy and Framework

Written by Denys Collins


This Article Will Discuss:

  • Core Philosophies of Social Thinking
  • The Four Steps of Perspective Taking
  • The Four Steps of Communication
  • ILAUGH Model
  • Social Thinking in the Academic World

In October of 2017, the Autism Society of Alaska is proud to present their Second Annual Autism Conference. The keynote speaker will be Michelle Garcia Winner, the pioneer behind Social Thinking. Social Thinking is a framework for teaching students that experience social challenges. Previously, we looked at a quick overview of Social Thinking. Now, we are going to look at the core philosophies of Social Thinking and the main framework used.

 Philosophy of Social Thinking

Let’s begin with the core philosophies. First, Social Thinking is something we do all day even when alone. We have thoughts about people and situations. These thoughts have an effect on how we feel and act, and how we act has an effect on how those around us think and feel. This thought process usually begins with our eyes. As Michelle Garcia Winner says, “we think with our eyes.” We use our eyes to gauge how our interactions are going. Gauging interactions is important because a major part of socializing is trying to make those around us comfortable while they are doing the same to us. This occurs even when we have no intention of interacting. We are very conscious of the perceptions others have of us, and we want them to be generally pleasant instead of “weird” or “uncomfortable.” Those with social learning challenges may struggle with this. The last main philosophy is there is not one way we “should” act in social situations or one way we want to be seen. These constantly evolve and change depending on age, situation, and culture.

Social Thinking can be difficult to teach and explain because it is something a large portion of the population do without even realizing. If you want to teach someone to be a better social thinker you cannot just have them memorize social skills because socializing involves nuance. They must be taught about the presence of other people’s minds, thoughts, and feelings. A great strategy offered by Social Thinking is The Four Steps of Perspective Taking. These are the four steps we all engage in for any social interaction.

 

The Four Steps of Perspective Taking

  1. As two people enter a space, they each have a thought about the other.
  2. They each will monitor what they think each other’s intentions and motivations are.
  3. Each will consider what the other is thinking about them and whether it is positive, negative, or neutral. Any previous encounters will be taken into consideration as well.
  4. They each monitor and possibly change their behavior to influence the other to think about them the way they would prefer.

When we are teaching those with social challenges, we need to remember communication is more than offering a script. It is an entire body and mind effort. This is where the Four Steps of Communication come into play.

The Four Steps of Communication

  1. Think about other people’s thoughts and feelings as well as your own. For communication to happen successfully, we must consider our partner’s perspective. We should be on the same topic and our thoughts should stay connected throughout.
  2. Establish physical presence, enter with your body attuned to the group. For a positive communicative act, we should stand about an arm’s length from those we speak to, and we should have a physical posture that conveys we want to participate. We should appear relaxed yet engaged during communication.
  3. We think with our eyes. If students learn this they learn to monitor how others are feeling or make an educated guess as to what they may be thinking about. We do not just blankly stare either because this could make people uncomfortable.
  4. Use your words to relate to others. We share our thoughts through language. We must teach students to stay on topic as to not appear self centered or unfriendly. They must learn to ask questions, add a thought, and show interest.

The final important framework for understanding and teaching Social Thinking is ILAUGH.  Michelle Garcia Winner developed it in order to help professionals and parents understand and think about the struggles faced by those with social learning challenges. It is completely research-based.

ILAUGH

I=Initiation of Language to Ask For Help:

Initiation of communication is the ability to use one’s language skills (verbal and nonverbal) to initiate something that is not routine.  This can be in the form of difficulty asking for help, seeking clarification, executing a new task, and entering and exiting a peer group.

L= Listening with Eyes and Brain:

Listening requires not only receiving auditory information, but also the integration of visual information with auditory information within the context  to understand the full meaning of the message being conveyed. This is also referred to as “active listening” or whole body listening.

 A = Abstract and Inferential Thinking: 

Most of the language we use is not intended for literal interpretation. Our communication is peppered with idioms, metaphors, sarcasm and inferences. Each generation adds its own, mostly abstract, slang.

U = Understanding Perspective:

To understand the differing perspectives of others requires that one’s Theory of Mind (perspective taking) work quickly and efficiently. Perspective taking is not one thing, it represents many things happening all at once as previously described.

G = Getting the Big Picture (Gestalt Processing):

Due to the fact that information is conveyed through concepts and not just facts, it is important that one is able to tie individual pieces of information into the greater concept. For example, when engaged in a conversation, the participants should be able to intuitively determine the underlying concept(s) being discussed, as well as identify the specific details that are shared.

H = Humor and Human Relatedness:

Human relatedness is at the heart of social interaction. Most of us desire some form of social interaction, but the struggle is having the ability to relate to other’s minds, emotions and needs. Establishing the concept of human relatedness is essential.

Social Thinking Social Learning Tree Poster

Social Thinking and Academia

Unbeknownst to many, Social Thinking is vital in the academic world. For example, individuals who struggle to interpret the abstract/inferential meaning of language also routinely struggle with academic tasks such as reading comprehension of literature. Also, perspective taking is central to group participation in school or when interpreting information that requires understanding of other’s minds such as history and social studies. Another reason Social Thinking is important is because classrooms depend heavily on having all students attend non-verbally to the expectations in the classroom and some may struggle to comprehend information presented via the dual challenges of social visual information (reading nonverbal cues) and auditory processing. When reading, one has to follow the overall meaning rather than just collect a series of seemingly unrelated facts. As with many elements of social cognition, this ability relies heavily on strong executive function skills. As a result, difficulty with organizational strategies often stems from problems with conceptual processing. Weaknesses in the development of this skill can greatly impact one’s ability to formulate written expression, summarize reading passages, and manage one’s homework load, as well as obtain the intended meaning from a social conversation.  With all of the issues, if they are not dealt with, they will follow students into the employment world.

It is clear, social skills are an important part of everyone’s life. We need to ensure that what we are teaching our students is setting them up for the most success in life. Students need to learn how others think and to see their point of view. They also need to understand the “why” behind the social and communication skills required in different situations. They must not just memorize. They have to be flexible and change depending on the situation. This will help them generalize a concept to many different scenarios. It is imperative that we teach our students with compassion and humor. Many of the clients with whom we work with have a very good sense of humor, but they often feel anxious because they miss many of the subtle cues that help them to understand how to use their humor successfully with others. We need to help minimize the anxiety the individual may experience. Everyone must realize, Social Thinking is about more than relationships with family and friends. This is about setting students up for success in school and employment.

Sources:

Social Thinking Core Philosophies

Four Steps of Perspective Taking

Four Steps of Communication

ILAUGH

(https://www.socialthinking.com/Articles?id=32c05379cd1b408baa6bad0e0ee23918)

(Kranz & McClannahan, 1993; Rao, Beidel, & Murray, 2008; Whalen, Schreibman, & Ingersoll 2006)

(Jones & Carr, 2004; Klin, Jones, Schultz, & Volkmar, 2003; Kunce & Mesibov, 1998; MacDonald et al., 2006; Marshall & Fox, 2006; Mundy & Crowson, 1997; Saulnier & Klin, 2007)

(Adams, Green, Gilchrist, & Cox, 2002; Happe’, 1995; Kerbel & Grunwell, 1998; Minshew, Goldstein, Muenz & Payton, 1992; Norbury & Bishop, 2002; Rapin & Dunn, 2003; Simmons-Mackie & Damico, 2003)

(Baron-Cohen, 1995; Baron-Cohen, 2000; Baron-Cohen & Jolliffe, 1997; Flavell, 2004; Frith, & Frith, 2010; Hale & Tager-Flusberg, 2005; Kaland, Callesen, Moller-Nielsen, Mortensen, & Smith, 2007; Spek, Scholte, & Van Berckelaer-Omnes, 2010)

(Fullerton, Stratton, Coyne & Gray, 1996; Happe’ & Frith, 2006; Hume, Loftin, & Lantz, 2009; Pelicano, 2010; Plaisted, 2001; Shah & Frith, 1993; van Lang, Bouma, Sytema, Kraijer, & Minderaa 2006)

 

(Gutstein, 2001; Greenspan, & Wieder, 2003; Losh & Capps, 2006; Loukusa et al., 2007; Ozonoff, & Miller, 1996; Prizant, Wetherby, Rubin, & Laurent, 2003; Prizant, Wetherby, Rubin, Laurent & Rydell, 2006; Williams & Happe’, 2010)

 

2nd Autism Conference Call for Papers

Alaska Autism Society of Alaska Conference Call for Papers

The Autism Society of Alaska’s 2nd Annual State Conference will be held October 5th and 6th in Fairbanks Alaska. 

If you wish to submit a proposal to present at one or more sessions at our 2017 conference, please note the following important information:

  • Submissions will only be accepted at our email address: autism907@gmail.com
  • All submissions must be received by August 8th, 2017.
  • A disclosure form (identifying potential conflicts of interest) will be required for all presentations. Please note the Autism Society of Alaska conference presentations cannot promote or advertise a commercial product or service without disclosure. All presentations will be permitted at the discretion of the Autism Society of Alaska.
  • All selected presenters will be notified by August 22nd, 2017.
  • All presenters must register for the conference.  Attendance fees will be waived for presenters. A registration code will be sent to speakers once approved.

 

BEFORE YOU SUBMIT – THINGS TO CONSIDER

 

The Autism Society uses People First language and encourages you to do the same. When preparing your proposal, keep in mind the audience is professionals, individuals on the autism spectrum, family members and advocates. Your presentation must encompass something for everyone and language should reflect the diversity of our conference attendees.

 

Presentations should include how your topic would help the audience to learn more about or help achieve one or more of these according to the lifespan topics indicated:

  1. Adult topics: Self-advocacy, transition, relationships, self-identity, housing pathways.
  2. Employment: What are options for employees & employers?
  3. Alaska Insurance: Medicaid, Alaska required insurance & social security.
  4. Financial: Abel Act, setting up a trust, care when primary providers are gone.
  5. Communication: Alternative communication options for nonverbal individuals, as well as the providers. Caregivers and support systems.
  6. IEP/504: What is an IEP, how do I get one, what does it allow, is this just for education or for college and employment as well?
  7. Healthy Lifestyles: How to spark interest and get started and what is available in Alaska?
  8. Diagnosis: Who can diagnose in Alaska. How to get a diagnosis as a minor as well as an adult. What is the next step after receiving a diagnosis?
  9. Services: What agencies, services and therapies are available in Alaska? What are the programs (i.e care coordination, STAR, mini grants, wait list, waivers, TEFRA, tri-care ECHO (military) respite, day habilitation, in home support , job coaches)
  10. Home therapies: What are things that can be done at home to help with sleep, eating, transitions, family and community engagement and interactions?
  11. Families: How can we support our siblings? How can we maintain healthy relationships, friendships and marriage? What can I do when I feel overwhelmed or underwhelmed about being a primary caregiver? How can we manage through everyday stresses?

STEPS & INSTRUCTIONS: Presenters

Biographical Sketch

In addition to contact information, please provide a biographical sketch for each presenter, in 50 words maximum.  Presenter(s) and co-author listing must include credentials (Ph.D., etc.)

Example bio

Temple Grandin, Ph.D. 

Dr. Temple Grandin is an internationally respected specialist in designing livestock handling systems. She is the most well-renowned individual with autism in the world today. Dr. Grandin is a best-selling author and activist.

Note: presenters submitting a presentation for a Continuing Education session must include a CV/Resume, 100 words maximum

Title of Presentation

Come up with a good, intriguing session title.  It’s the first and perhaps only impression you’ll make on a potential attendee. The primary purpose of a title is to get the attendee to read the first sentence of the description. Here is an example of a session title, and how it should be written:

Example 1:  A Long and Winding Road: An Examination of the Transition Process for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder 

Example 2:  Peer Mediated Supports for College Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

 

Learning Objectives 

(maximum 50 words for each learning objective: minimum two, maximum three) Craft strong learning objectives. Please complete two (2) out of three (3) Learning Objectives for each proposal in your submission. Any submission with fewer than two will be declined. It is crucial that you follow the guidelines for writing learning objectives as described below. There is a limit of 50 words for each learning objective. Strong Learning Objectives have three distinguishing characteristics: (1) observable, (2) measurable, (3) must match the content of your proposal as described in your title, description, and content plan. Encouragement of using active verbs that indicate what will be taught, demonstrated, or experienced. Here are examples of action verbs: Identify, summarize, list, describe, differentiate, discuss, compute, predict, explain, demonstrate, utilize, analyze, design, select, create, plan, assess, compare, critique, write, apply, demonstrate, prepare, use, compile, revise.

 

The following are three examples of well-written learning objectives using active verbs.  Participants who attend this presentation will be able to:

 

Example 1: List three attributes of autism spectrum disorder.

Example 2: Compare and contrast the characteristics of night terrors versus nightmares.

Example 3: Describe three clinical techniques to use when an individual with autism is suffering from disturbing nightmares or having sleepless nights.

 

Description of Presentation

(50 words maximum) The description must provide and be reflective of your title and your content plan. A session description should get the reader to say, “Hmm, that sounds interesting.” Choose the right words to accurately describe the session, pull readers in and get them to commit to attending the session and see the benefits of the presentation. This description is what attendees will see in the conference program.

 

Content Plan

This description must provide information that is essential to the review process. The content plan should include: details on the content that will be provided and sufficient information to determine how the session contributes to best practice and advances the field of autism spectrum disorders.  Abstracts are limited to 500 words maximum.

 

Social Thinking, It is Everywhere

An Introduction to Social Thinking

By Denys Collins

July 14, 2017

Quick Look

  • Social thinking (lower case) is what we do when we share a space with others.
  • Social Thinking (capitalized) is a framework that breaks down complex social situations into easy to understand and easy to teach concepts.
  • It is best for ages 4 to adult that have  social learning challenges with or without a diagnostic label.

 

What is social thinking?

People  spend their whole life learning social skills without ever realizing it. As babies, people begin to observe others, and then they begin to communicate and interact.  The more people socialize, the more they are able to understand people and situations in order to act accordingly. Social thinking is our innate ability  to think through a social situation by “interpreting thoughts, beliefs, intentions, emotions, knowledge and actions of another person along with the context of the situation to understand that person’s experience.” We then apply this information and respond. Our response affects how the other person will respond which then affects our emotions. Everyone does this all day long:

  • At home: Your spouse gives you the silent treatment, you have to figure out why
  • At work: Your boss calls you into their office. While you walk over, you try to discover her intentions.
  • Reading a book: You look at the connection between the characters and their influence on each other.
  • Texting: You need to detect sarcasm before you respond.
  • Flirting: You try to pick up on hints of interest that aren’t being directly stated.
  • School: Your best friend is playing with someone else, and you try to determine why they aren’t playing with you.

Those that  have social learning challenges may find the practice of social thinking to be confusing and complicated. This has nothing to do with intelligence. Some people born with developmental disabilities do not soak up social information as intuitively  as others. They will need to learn social skills and actively think through social situations. This can be done much easier with someone to help them through different scenarios. This brings us to Michelle Garcia Winner.

Who is Michelle Garcia Winner?

Michelle Garcia Winner is a speech language pathologist (SLP). She focuses on helping individuals with social learning challenges.

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In the mid 1990s she became a SLP for a public high school district. She began to see a trend with many of the students she worked with. They had strong intelligence and language, but their social communication skills were lacking. Social Thinking was born. A few years later she opened her own private practice for Social Thinking. She started a company under the same name and began public speaking on the topic, publishing books, and creating products.  She has won many awards including:

  • Congressional Recognition Award, 2008
  • Lifetime Achievement Award, the Prentice School, 2012
  • Outstanding Achievement Award, California Speech-Language-Hearing Association (CSHA), 2012
  • Community Partner Award, Massachusetts Association for the Blind (MAB) Community Services, 2016

What is Social Thinking?

Social Thinking is a framework  created by Michelle Garcia Winner. It is targeted at helping those with social learning and communication challenges. People are taught to think about their thoughts and emotions and of those around them. Social Thinking takes the complex steps of social skills and breaks them down into steps. Ideas are stated in an easy to understand way. For example, instead of being told to “make eye contact, they are taught to think with their eyes.”  Social Thinking is a three-part process:

  1. Learn to closely observe the social world we live in.
  2. Learn to adapt social skills to meet social goals by becoming self-aware, self-monitoring, and having self-control.
  3. Become more aware of your emotions and better predict and relate to the emotions of others.

Who is it for?

The concepts and strategies can be helpful for anyone. One can find them being  used in:

  • Homes
  • Schools: Public, Private, Charter (Special Education, Mainstream)
  • Private Programs
  • Clinics
  • Community Programs (Sports, Clubs)
  • Therapy Offices
  • Places of Employment
  • Universities

The most common target audience is:

  • Those with social learning challenges
  • Ages four to adulthood
  • Average to above average language and cognitive skills
  • With or without a diagnostic label
  • Some of the many diagnostic labels:
    • Aperger’s Syndrome
    • Autism Spectrum Disorder
    • Social communication Disorder
    • PDD-NOS, ADHD/ADD
    • Non-verbal learning disability
    • Specific Language Impairment
    • Learning disabilities
    • TBI-Traumatic
    • Down Syndrome
    • Brain Injury
    • Velocardial Facial Syndrome
    • Social Anxiety
    • And many more

Wrap It Up

As you can see, social thinking is a major part of our life. It is practiced every time we enter a space where other people are. Even with all the intellect in the world, a lack of social skills can lead to struggling through many daily activities. This is not just about having friends and relationships; this is also about succeeding at work and school.

If you or your child is struggling with social skills or you are a teacher or therapist and  would like more information, please go to socialthinking.com where this information was found. You can also attend the 2nd Autism Alaska Conference. It is October 5th and 6th, 2017 with keynote speaker, Michelle Garcia Winner. This is an event you won’t want to miss.

July 4th Weekend

Sharing resources to create a safe and successful fourth of July

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All information is from http://positivelyautism.weebly.com/

A social story can help prepare your child for an activity or event. Here’s a free 4th of July social story from Positively Autism: http://www.positivelyautism.com/downloads/4thofJulysocialskillstory.pdf

Tips for Celebrating the Fourth of July with a Child with Autism –http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/on-parenting/tips-for-celebrating-the-fourth-of-july-with-a-child-with-autism/2013/07/03/61338406-e265-11e2-80eb-3145e2994a55_story.html

Parent Tips: Surviving 4th of July Fireworks –http://www.pathfindersforautism.org/articles/view/parent-tips-surviving-4th-of-july-fireworks

10 Tips for Enjoying Fireworks on the 4th of July with Autism –http://www.abpathfinder.com/fireworkswithautism/